A hand up

  1. A hand up

    Give a man a fish, and you feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish and feed him for a lifetime. Never definitively attributed to one source, the spirit of this proverb encapsulates the mission of Metro Lutheran Ministries (“MLM”), who want to offer a hand up, rather than a hand out. Started in 1971 by Kansas City Lutheran churches working in partnership, MLM helps people in need regardless of race, religion and nationality. Their goal is to provide clients a clear path to self-sufficiency through a continuum of care that immediately addresses short term stability and eventually helps clients achieve lasting stability. Immediate needs are met through food assistance programs offering breakfasts, sack lunches and monthly food distributions and community gardens. Other initiatives focus on housing security and stability to help clients live in dignity and safety. Longer term needs are addressed through income sufficiency programs designed to educate and empower families to better control their own finances and futures. Through offices in mid-town Kansas City, Kansas City-North and Wyandotte County, KS., MLM relies on over 2,000 volunteers that give over 17,000 hours of their time, a crucial component to meet the needs before them. Last year alone, they distributed 800 sack lunches to clients who came in for other types of assistance. They staffed and ran the Christmas Store, an annual effort to make Christmas a little merrier, helping more than 4,000 clients. They maintained the orchard and community gardens which produced over 2,400 pounds of healthy fare for the nearby…

  2. What will tomorrow bring

    “It was the best of times; it was the worst of times.” We make no claim for originality — that belongs to Charles Dickens, writing in the nineteenth century about an event, the French Revolution, that occurred in the eighteenth century. All that brings to mind an old cliche: “The more things change, the more they remain the same,” or even Dwight Eisenhower’s famous garbled quote: “Things are more like they are now than they ever have been.” The point of this verbal meandering? Simply that the world is always unsettled somewhere. Good and bad events are not mutually exclusive, they have gone on side by side for all of history. As investors, we watch events and consider how they will affect the economy, politics, and, most important, our portfolios. The truth is, we can only guess. We can make educated guesses based on history and experience, but, in the end, there is no certainty. That is why our focus is on earnings and growth. How should this uncertainty influence your investment decisions and instructions to your advisor? That depends, to a great extent, on your personality, your investing horizon, your goals, and the impact it has on your tolerance for risk. When Mitchell Capital is engaged, new clients create a set of investment guidelines, basically setting limits on the equity and fixed income components of their portfolios. These are the directives our managers will follow and serve as the guideposts for moving forward in an uncertain world. At their best, guidelines strip the emotion…

  3. A new airport – it is time

    The debate concerning what to do about Kansas City’s airport goes on. And on. Once the triple-horseshoe configuration at KCI seemed futuristic. It was convenient. It was architecturally outstanding. It was a landmark. Then things changed. Pre-boarding security was initiated weeks after the airport’s completion in 1972. This has led to the disruptive multi-gate security divisions and the resultant crowded passenger waiting areas with inadequate facilities and extremely limited concessions. Incoming passengers are forced to navigate these spaces through unmarked exits and milling passengers waiting to board. Concessionaires are not interested in serving the airport because there is no common waiting area beyond security where enough people gather to make operating viable. Airlines have adopted hub-and-spoke flight systems, eliminating Kansas City from the possibility of becoming a hub because of the difficulty of changing gates or terminals. The two operating terminals have become old and dilapidated, and remodeling them would be costly without resolving the basic problems. The third has been closed for lack of demand since 2014. This has all been obvious for years, as the city council has failed to state the issues clearly and dithered over architectural and financing issues while local infrequent fliers cling to the idea of curbside drop-off, ignoring the operational deficiencies. Regular fliers will recognize that KCI offers a poor welcome to the city, and that while some other airports have become endless construction sites, we have a chance to get it right. A new terminal will cost taxpayers nothing. It will either be privately financed as Burns…

  4. Brandon Reed Earns CFA®

    Brandon Reed, Equity Analyst at Mitchell Capital Management has earned the prestigious Chartered Financial Analyst® (CFA®) designation. The CFA charter, the most respected and recognized investment credential in the world, represents a tradition of upholding the highest standards of education and integrity in the investment profession. The charter is recognized globally by employers, investment professionals, and investors as the definitive standard by which to measure the competence, integrity, and dedication of serious investment professionals. Recipients of the CFA charter have successfully completed the CFA Program, a graduate-level, self-study curriculum and a series of three intensive examinations taken sequentially, which, in total, takes most candidates between two and five years. Candidate surveys report that preparation for the three exams typically requires at least 900 combined hours of study. The CFA Program, which is administered by CFA Institute, the global not-for-profit association of investment professionals, sets a standard that is acknowledged around the world for measuring the competence and integrity of financial analysts, portfolio managers, and investment advisers. Currently, more than 100,000 investment professionals in 135 countries and territories hold the CFA charter. The first CFA exam was administered in 1963. Due to the rigor of the program, only around one in five candidates who enroll in the CFA Program pass all three exams and meet the professional and ethical requirements to earn the charter. Earning the designation demonstrates mastery of the skills most needed for investment analysis and decision making in today’s fast-evolving global financial industry. Administered worldwide in English, the CFA Program is firmly grounded…